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NCAA warns North Carolina to repeal anti-LGBT law or risk losing championships

The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) has given North Carolina a deadline to repeal House Bill 2.

In a statement released Thursday, the NCAA said that it wold not consider locating events in North Carolina through 2022 if the state does not repeal the law by next week.

"Last year, the NCAA Board of Governors relocated NCAA championships scheduled in North Carolina because of the cumulative impact HB2 had on local communities' ability to assure a safe, healthy, discrimination free atmosphere for all those watching and participating in our events. Absent any change in the law, our position remains the same regarding hosting current or future events in the state. As the state knows, next week our various sports committees will begin making championships site selections for 2018-2022 based upon bids received from across the country. Once the sites are selected by the committee, those decisions are final and an announcement of all sites will be made on April 18," the group said.

Republican leaders approved House Bill 2 during a one-day special session last year. It blocks cities and municipalities from enacting LGBT protections. It is also the first, and so far only, state law to prohibit transgender people from using the bathroom of their choice.

Democratic Governor Roy Cooper again called for repeal on Thursday.

"I have offered numerous compromises and remain open to any deal that will bring jobs and sports back to North Carolina and begin to repair our reputation," Cooper said in a statement. "Legislative Republicans have been all too happy to use their super-majorities to pass damaging partisan laws. It's time for them to step up, meet halfway, and repeal HB 2."

Passage of House Bill 2 led to an economic boycott of North Carolina worth more than $400 million in lost revenue, according to an analysis by Wired.
Article provided in partnership with On Top Magazine
 
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